scienceisbeauty:

A simulation of gravitationally interacting dark matter particles in the Universe shows the stringy nature of dark matter, peppered with voids, over the largest distance scales.
Credit: N. Hamaus/Paris Inst. of Astrophys. & M. Warren/Los Alamos National Lab
Source: Universal Formula for Cosmic Voids (American Physical Society-Physics)
Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 251302 (2014)

scienceisbeauty:

A simulation of gravitationally interacting dark matter particles in the Universe shows the stringy nature of dark matter, peppered with voids, over the largest distance scales.

Credit: N. Hamaus/Paris Inst. of Astrophys. & M. Warren/Los Alamos National Lab

Source: Universal Formula for Cosmic Voids (American Physical Society-Physics)

Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 251302 (2014)

earthstory:

Change in Arctic sea ice; 1979 to 2012. Sometimes a picture speaks louder than words. -Jean

earthstory:

Change in Arctic sea ice; 1979 to 2012.

Sometimes a picture speaks louder than words.

-Jean

(via climate-changing)

mapsontheweb:

Countries that lie on the Equator and countries that lie on the Prime Meridian

mapsontheweb:

Countries that lie on the Equator and countries that lie on the Prime Meridian

(Source: reddit.com)

climate-changing:

octupvs:

Sem título | Ahmed Mahin Fayaz on Flickr

Sir Arthur Charles Clarke, CBE, FRAS (Sri Lankabhimanya Arthur Charles Clarke) (16 December 1917 – 19 March 2008) was a British science fiction writer, science writer, inventor, undersea explorer, and television series host.
He is perhaps most famous for being co-writer of the screenplay for the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey, considered by the American Film Institute to be one of the most influential films of all time. His other science fiction writings earned him a number of Hugo and Nebula awards, along with a large readership, making him into one of the towering figures of the field. For many years he, along with Robert Heinlein and Isaac Asimov, were known as the “Big Three” of science fiction.
Clarke was a lifelong proponent of space travel. In 1934 while still a teenager, he joined the British Interplanetary Society. In 1945, he proposed a satellite communication system—an idea that, in 1963, won him the Franklin Institute’s Stuart Ballantine Medal. Later he was the chairman of the British Interplanetary Society from 1946–47 and again in 1951–53.
Clarke was also a science writer, who was both an avid populariser of space travel and a futurist of uncanny ability, who won a Kalinga Prize (award given by UNESCO for popularising science) in 1961. These all together eventually earned him the moniker “prophet of the space age”.
Clarke emigrated to Sri Lanka in 1956, largely to pursue his interest in scuba diving. That year he discovered the underwater ruins of the ancient Koneswaram temple in Trincomalee.
Clarke augmented his fame later on in the 1980s, by being the host of several television shows such as Arthur C. Clarke’s Mysterious World.
He lived in Sri Lanka until his death. He was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1998 and was awarded Sri Lanka’s highest civil honour, Sri Lankabhimanya, in 2005.

climate-changing:

octupvs:

Sem título | Ahmed Mahin Fayaz on Flickr

Sir Arthur Charles Clarke, CBE, FRAS (Sri Lankabhimanya Arthur Charles Clarke) (16 December 1917 – 19 March 2008) was a British science fiction writer, science writer, inventor, undersea explorer, and television series host.

He is perhaps most famous for being co-writer of the screenplay for the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey, considered by the American Film Institute to be one of the most influential films of all time. His other science fiction writings earned him a number of Hugo and Nebula awards, along with a large readership, making him into one of the towering figures of the field. For many years he, along with Robert Heinlein and Isaac Asimov, were known as the “Big Three” of science fiction.

Clarke was a lifelong proponent of space travel. In 1934 while still a teenager, he joined the British Interplanetary Society. In 1945, he proposed a satellite communication system—an idea that, in 1963, won him the Franklin Institute’s Stuart Ballantine Medal. Later he was the chairman of the British Interplanetary Society from 1946–47 and again in 1951–53.

Clarke was also a science writer, who was both an avid populariser of space travel and a futurist of uncanny ability, who won a Kalinga Prize (award given by UNESCO for popularising science) in 1961. These all together eventually earned him the moniker “prophet of the space age”.

Clarke emigrated to Sri Lanka in 1956, largely to pursue his interest in scuba diving. That year he discovered the underwater ruins of the ancient Koneswaram temple in Trincomalee.

Clarke augmented his fame later on in the 1980s, by being the host of several television shows such as Arthur C. Clarke’s Mysterious World.

He lived in Sri Lanka until his death. He was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1998 and was awarded Sri Lanka’s highest civil honour, Sri Lankabhimanya, in 2005.

Need A Writing Mentor? Ask an Author!

lettersandlight:

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Get ready, Campers. Camp NaNoWriMo will be back in session in just three days, and guess what’s back too? Our beloved Ask An Author series! Four published authors will take turns serving as your Head Camp Counselor, and will answer your most pressing writing questions.

So, strap that pack…

“It’s time to do our part. Give children of the world a brand new start.”

madeinafreeworld:

image

Pharrell Williams sings these powerful words in “‘Til Everyone Can See,” a song released by the International Labour Organization (ILO) to raise awareness about the 168 million children in forced labor worldwide.

SIGN UP to download this song and support the ILO’s “Red Card to Child Labour” campaign as players compete during the World Cup.

To a Future Writer: Keep Trying Hard Things (and the Occasional Crackfic)

lettersandlight:

image

We asked participants in our Young Writers Program to write a letter to their future selves about their hopes, dreams, and reminders of what they love about creating on the page. If you want to support the future of tomorrow’s stories,check out our YWP campaign here. Today, Stella hopes she never forgets NaNoWriMo:

Dear future me,

What’s the future like? I bet it’s not really all that different. Sure, there might be new social media, new franchises, new political issues. But I bet a lot of things are the same. You probably still haven’t reached 5 feet, haven’t gotten around to watching Soul Eater (but still rewatch FMA Brotherhood at least twice yearly), and there probably still aren’t flying cars like National Geographic promised we’d have by 2012 (those jerks)…

But most importantly, I bet you still write. Sure, maybe not full time. Maybe you still never finish anything, and maybe you still have a hard time coming up with characters. Even so, I’m sure you still write, be it full-length novels or 300-word crackfics at 2 AM. And I can say for certain that you still do NaNoWriMo every year, without fail.

Read More

scienceisbeauty:

Polar graph art made with the app `Quick Graph´… A bit kitsch, but cool anyway.

(Via)

mapsontheweb:

Ravensburger The Earth - 540 Piece Puzzleball (affiliate)
Exercise your mind with Ravensburger’s 540-piece The Earth Puzzleball. This 3D puzzle is composed of 540 curved pieces that snap together to form a detailed, full-color globe. Each puzzle piece is printed with a number on the inside to assist with construction, or you can go by image alone for a real challenge. Recommended for children ages12 and older, the set provides hours of puzzle-solving fun for budding geographers and makes a beautiful decorative piece when completed.

mapsontheweb:

Ravensburger The Earth - 540 Piece Puzzleball (affiliate)

Exercise your mind with Ravensburger’s 540-piece The Earth Puzzleball. This 3D puzzle is composed of 540 curved pieces that snap together to form a detailed, full-color globe. Each puzzle piece is printed with a number on the inside to assist with construction, or you can go by image alone for a real challenge. Recommended for children ages12 and older, the set provides hours of puzzle-solving fun for budding geographers and makes a beautiful decorative piece when completed.